Narconon Review: Arrowhead

Alcohol Takes a Huge Toll on Families and Society

When a person abuses alcohol, he may not even notice if a problem is starting to develop. It seems fine to have a few drinks in a social situation and no one seems to have a problem with him. But after years, his drinking may have become excessive and he may have developed an addiction to alcohol. When this happens, although his family and friends may be reluctant to tell him, it is time to do something about it. When he or she is your family member, you probably already know what it is like to have to make excuses for his or her drinking and the embarrassing things he (or she) may have done when drunk.

Alcohol takes a significant toll on the children of alcoholics. It also has a huge impact on society as a whole. When several studies looked at the children of alcohol and drug abusers, they found that there is a relationship between parental drug or alcohol abuse and subsequent alcohol or drug problems in the children. The cost to society in terms of health problems, legal system issues and traffic fatalities is immense.

Alcohol Abuse in Your Own Family

When it gets personal and the alcohol abuser is your spouse, child or even your parent, it is vital to see that the person gets help at a competent drug and alcohol rehab program. This is not always easy to do as most alcoholics live in denial about their alcohol problem. Most do not view it as a problem until they get involved in some kind of wake-up call event like an accident. Even then, it may be that the person cannot connect his drinking to the disaster. But family members can see it and need to take action to get help as soon as possible.

The Narconon Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Program Can Help

Rehab Graduate Bob W.

Luckily for the individual who has a problem with alcohol or drugs, Narconon can help. Since 1966, the Narconon drug and alcohol rehab program helped those who needed to recovery from addiction to drugs or alcohol. Narconon is so effective that it has expanded to nearly fifty residential rehab centers on six continents today.

At any Narconon center, a recovering drug user or alcoholic can get real help to recover his sobriety. The program is broken down into eight unique steps to help the former user address various aspects of drug abuse. Parts of the program help him address the physical effects of drugs or alcohol on his body so that the toxicity of the body does not prevent his full recovery. Other parts help him learn the skills he will need to be able to live without the need for drugs or alcohol again. In fact, the program is so successful that the majority of its graduates remain drug-free long after completing the program.

Bob Got Help at Narconon

Bob had been drinking for many years and his alcohol use had alienated his family, his close friends and close relationships. Before he arrived at Narconon Arrowhead in Oklahoma, Bob said, "Everybody tried to be civil about it." His friends didn't let on that they were upset about his alcohol problem.

But when he realized that he could not give up alcohol, he knew he had a problem. He was fortunate to find the Narconon program where he was able to turn his life around. At one point in the program, he said, "I realized that I felt great suddenly."

Bob concluded, "My life is like a miracle. It may be a cliché but if I could have picked my life, this is it. I'm happy. What else could you want?"

This can be the happy result for your loved one.



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References

  • Pediatrics. 1999 May; 103(5 Pt. 2):1085-99. Children of substance abusers: overview of research findings. Johnson JL, Leff M, Department of Psychiatry, Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse. University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Available online at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10224196
  • Psychiatry Serv. 2002 Aug; 53(8):1001-9. Adverse childhood experiences, alcoholic parents, and later risk of alcoholism and depression. Anda RF, Whitfield CL, Felitti VJ, Chapman D, Edwards VJ, Dube SR, Williamson DF. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. Available online at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12161676?dopt=Abstract







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